latimes:

Southern California’s gambling armada

During the 1920s and 1930s, gambling ships were a common sight along the southern California coast, floating between legal loopholes until a swift crackdown in 1939.

There may have been a gambling ban in California at the time, but state jurisdiction only extends three miles out to sea. Meanwhile, gamblers assumed that the lack of a federal ban on the practice kept them relatively in the clear. At least until Aug. 1, 1939…

From the Times’ original article on the final straw for law enforcement:

Moving the arm of California law out to sea yesterday representatives of the state and county governments closed three gambling casinos off Santa Monica and Long Beach and blockaded another, marooning 600 patrons on board.

More than 250 deputy sheriffs and district attorney’s investigators participated in the raids, which were conducted with utmost secrecy.

At Long Beach, the Mt. Baker (The Showboat) and the Tango were boarded and taken over by officers who placed nearly a score of men in custody and seized more than $30,000 in stakes.

For more on the lawless nearby Pacific, and The Rex, a single ship which was frequented by more than 850,000 individuals in a year, head over to Framework.

Photos: Paul Calvert / Los Angeles Times, Associated Press, Wide World Press

83 Notes

humanoidhistory:

Scenes from the Watts riots in Los Angeles, California, August 11-17, 1965. (Los Angeles Public Library)

75 Notes

noirbynight:

Murder at 1328 East 1st Street (1951).  The body of murder victim Richard Hardy lies sprawled on sidewalk after being shot in an argument over a dollar bill.
source: USC Digital Archives

noirbynight:

Murder at 1328 East 1st Street (1951).  The body of murder victim Richard Hardy lies sprawled on sidewalk after being shot in an argument over a dollar bill.

source: USC Digital Archives

32 Notes

thisblogofours:

Prohibition-Era LA
This photo, taken by the LAPD in 1933, shows the aftermath of a mob-related double-murder in a restaurant.

thisblogofours:

Prohibition-Era LA
This photo, taken by the LAPD in 1933, shows the aftermath of a mob-related double-murder in a restaurant.

554 Notes

phantomjoe309:

One of the highlights of the Black Dahlia exhibit at the Los Angeles Police Museum earlier this year was the never-before-seen photos of Elizabeth Short on display.

(Source: ladailymirror.com)

163 Notes

wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: 1 Million Vintage Crime Scene Photos Discovered in Los Angeles

Oddly amusing. Until recently, an old, deteriorated collection of no less than one million crime scene photographs rested silently in the nearly forgotten archives of the Los Angeles Police department. (warning: graphic images after the jump)

Read More

1066 Notes

(Source: just-skulls)

5432 Notes

californiastatelibrary:

It’s #FoodieFriday!  Check out this beautiful poster from the 1920s advertising Rose Brand Oranges.

californiastatelibrary:

It’s #FoodieFriday!  Check out this beautiful poster from the 1920s advertising Rose Brand Oranges.

13 Notes

twostriptechnicolor:

Making gifs has turned into a fine way to unwind lately… shown here- The original Brown Derby, on Wilshire Blvd. in 1934.

twostriptechnicolor:

Making gifs has turned into a fine way to unwind lately… shown here- The original Brown Derby, on Wilshire Blvd. in 1934.

(via lameekly)

112 Notes

4 Notes